Seeing the Tarkine

One of the great things about the Tarkine is that it is an accessible wild place, with great opportunities for seeing, accessing and experiencing the Tarkine’s extraordinary natural and cultural values. A number of small towns provide great access and accommodation points for the Tarkine, and recreational opportunities in the Tarkine include short and long bushwalks, kayaking, rafting, fishing, photography, camping, self-touring and 4wd-ing, along with wildlife viewing and nature appreciation. Take your time when visiting the Tarkine – the Tarkine’s differing moods and landscapes can’t be fully appreciated in a quick drive. We recommend you spend several days in the North-West region, which could include separate day-trips to different parts of the Tarkine or to engage in different experiences.

The Tarkine is situated in North-West Tasmania, which can be accessed by air at either the Burnie-Wynyard or Devonport airports, by the Spirit of Tasmania ferry service at Devonport, or by road with Burnie the key turn-off or gateway to the Tarkine approaching from the North, or via Queenstown / Strahan if approaching the Tarkine from the south.

** WARNING **

ALL VISITORS TO THE TARKINE SHOULD BE WELL PREPARED, AND SHOULD EXERCISE CAUTION, AND NOTE THAT THERE ARE A NUMBER OF HAZARDS THAT SHOULD BE TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT BY ALL VISITORS, INCLUDING:

  • Weather which can change very quickly, and extreme exposure in parts of the Tarkine that can be very hazardous for under-prepared visitors
  • Hazards of storm surges, swells, undercurrents, and freak waves on the Tarkine coast need to be carefully assessed
  • We advise that you DO NOT walk or journey off clearly marked and formed trails or tracks, as it is very easy to get lost in the Tarkine’s very thick vegetation If you have any concerns about weather or local conditions or any questions, please contact the Parks & Wildlife Service on 1300 135 513

Leave a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

A refuge for the Devil

The Tarkine is the home to the last disease free population of the Tasmanian Devil. The Tasmanaian Devil is being pushed to extinction by the fatal Devil Facial Tumour Disease. This disease has been estimated to have killed 80% of the Tasmanian Devil population in the past decade. As such the habitat of the Tarkine is critical to survival of this iconic species in the wild. Threats such as mining, logging and roading place the future of the Devil at risk.

Ten new mines for the Tarkine?

There are now ten new mines proposed for the Tarkine over the next five years, and the campaign to prevent this onslaught of destruction is heating up. Nine of these mines are Pilbara style open cut mines. The first two companies to submit for permits are Venture Minerals for their three proposed tin and iron ore mines at Mt Lindsay, and Shree Minerals for their proposed Nelson Bay River iron ore mine.